Belsky Weinberg & Horowitz, LLC A Personal Injury & Workers’ Compensation Law Firm

June 2015 Archives

Drunk driving might be stopped with a new technology

New technology that was introduced at a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration conference could help to put an end to drunk driving. The technology would be available as a safety option in new vehicles. It would measure a driver's blood alcohol concentration using either an infrared light or a breath test. Either method would take less than one second to complete, which wouldn't slow down sober Maryland drivers.

Speeding is major cause of car accidents

At one time or another, many Maryland motorists have driven over the posted speed limit, whether they were traveling on city streets, freeways or rural roads. Before they do so again, however, they should consider the consequences, the least of which is a traffic ticket on their driving record.

Studies show temporary workers at higher risk of injury

Maryland residents may be interested to learn that new research shows that temporary workers face more hazards at work than full-time employees. The information was presented at a joint session of the NORA Manufacturing Sector and Services Sector Council in June.

Poor communication and record-keeping in surgical errors

Maryland residents may be interested in an article in the journal "JAMA Surgery" that examined major surgical errors in American hospitals. Called "never events" because they are never supposed to occur, these incidents happen in rare circumstances. The researchers in this study looked at surgical fires, wrong-site surgery and the incidence of objects such as sponges being left in a patient after surgery.

OSHA prioritizing nurse injuries in health care settings

Nurses in Maryland may be interested to learn that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has announced plans to crack down on safety practices in the health care industry. Every year, more health care workers incur reported workplace injuries than workers of any other general industry.

Patients and human behavior-related surgical errors

Maryland surgical patients may take interest in a Mayo Clinic research study that examined the causes of 'never events," a term that is used to describe surgical mistakes that should never happen. Among 1.5 million invasive procedures performed over a five-year span at the Minnesota clinic, 69 never events were identified. Researchers determined that these never events were caused by 628 distinct human factors and that roughly four to nine human factors contributed to each surgical error.

Dangerous nail salon chemicals under scrutiny

Maryland residents may have heard about the purported health risks associated with prolonged exposure to chemicals found in nail salons. New research has linked such chemicals to health issues such as asthma, respiratory disease, miscarriages and cancer. The threat is so concerning that New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued emergency regulations protecting nail salon workers in May after The New York Times published a series of articles highlighting the dangers of the chemicals.

2 workers injured in construction accident

Maryland residents may have read that an industrial air conditioner fell 30 stories and damaged the side of a building in midtown New York City on May 31 at about 10:45 a.m. The unit was being hoisted to the top of the building with a crane when a cable snapped. Authorities say that 10 people including two construction workers were hurt by the debris that fell. They were taken to the hospital for treatment of minor injuries.

Improper antibiotic use is far too prevalent

Maryland patients should be aware of a 2015 study's findings that misdiagnosis commonly leads to improper antibiotic treatment. Incorrect antibiotic use can cause harm to patients by reducing the effectiveness of the drugs in future treatment and raising health care costs. Approximately 56 percent of inpatient hospital treatment involves the use of antibiotic therapies, but such treatment is found to be unnecessary in nearly half of those cases, according to the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

How Can We Help You?

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy