Belsky Weinberg & Horowitz, LLC A Personal Injury & Workers’ Compensation Law Firm

Workplace Injuries Archives

Protecting workers from falls on construction sites

It is well known that iron workers in particular, and construction workers in general, have very hazardous jobs. Each year, falls consistently rank among the top sources for injuries and fatalities on construction sites in Maryland and around the country. Meanwhile, fall protection violations are the top source of citations issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration each year. However, employers can greatly reduce these risks by carefully following the agency's fall protection guidelines.

OSHA targeting workplace safety for inpatient facilities

Health care workers in Maryland may be interested to learn that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is currently in the process of scrutinizing their industry. The move comes due to the fact that health care workers are injured at much higher rates than workers in any other industry while they are on the job.

Reducing the risk of workplace injuries in Maryland

According to a study done in collaboration with the University of Illinois School of Public Health, recycling workers face unnecessarily safety risks at work. From 2011 to 2013, 17 recycling workers died around the country, and on average, they are twice as likely as other workers to suffer an injury on the job. The study found that workers in this field contend with safety issues related to the use of heavy machinery. They are also likely to interact with toxic chemicals and hypodermic needles.

Studies show temporary workers at higher risk of injury

Maryland residents may be interested to learn that new research shows that temporary workers face more hazards at work than full-time employees. The information was presented at a joint session of the NORA Manufacturing Sector and Services Sector Council in June.

OSHA prioritizing nurse injuries in health care settings

Nurses in Maryland may be interested to learn that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has announced plans to crack down on safety practices in the health care industry. Every year, more health care workers incur reported workplace injuries than workers of any other general industry.

Workers' compensation benefits for animal-related injuries

Most Maryland residents will likely associate workplace injuries with accidents such as falls and explosions, but they can sometimes be caused by contact with animals. The most common form of animal-related injuries suffered by workers are insect or snake bites, but those who work in close contact with larger creatures such as cattle or horses may sometimes suffer broken bones or concussions.

The definition of a construction caught incident and examples

On a construction site, Maryland workers may need to be aware that there are two types of accidents that may occur. A struck incident occurs when the impact of an object causes injury to a worker, but a caught incident occurs when a worker becomes stuck or crushed between objects and suffers injury.

Dangers associated with excessive heat in the workplace

As Maryland workers may know, exposure to heat may have an effect on a person's health. Employers should inform workers about the problems associated with heat exposure and alert workers to the signs and symptoms. In addition, it is important to know what to do if heat exposure causes health problems and structure a plan to prevent or deal with working in a hot environment.

Skin problems from exposure to toxins or hazards

Maryland workers may encounter a wide variety of toxins and skin irritants in the course of their employment. From hazardous chemicals used in the production of factory products to the wind and extreme cold that must be endured by those obligated to work outside in the winter, it is the business's responsibility to be realistically aware of the hazards to the skin of their employees and to take all necessary precautions to ensure the safety of their workers.

More workplace injuries occur right after daylight saving

Workers in Maryland may have been affected by the loss of sleep after the daylight saving time change on March 8. While many people complain about having less time to sleep before work, research shows that the lost hour of sleep increases the likelihood of workplace injuries. According to the National Sleep Foundation, most workers need a few days to fully adjust to the time change.

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