Belsky Weinberg & Horowitz, LLC A Personal Injury & Workers’ Compensation Law Firm

Workers' Compensation Archives

Reducing financial losses from workplace injuries

When Maryland workers are injured on the job in Maryland, both they and their employer experience financial losses. Injured workers loses income while they are recovering from their injuries, and the worker's employer loses productivity. Financial losses from work-related accidents may be reduced if employers take steps to assess risks and create safer workplaces.

OSHA urges rest, shade and water in summer heat campaign

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has launched a safety campaign to remind employers in Maryland and around the country about the dangers of working outdoors during the summer months. Heat issues were responsible for the deaths of 18 workers in 2014 according to OSHA data, and more than 2,600 others suffered a heat-related illness of some kind. The federal workplace safety agency is urging employers to pay particular attention to their training and orientation programs, as many of its heat-related investigations involve workers with just a few days of on-the-job experience.

Employers must record injuries related to alcohol consumption

If a person in Maryland consumes alcohol before they go to work, they could be injured on the job as a result of their intoxication. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration requires employers to record alcohol-related injuries if the injuries are severe enough that they require more treatment than simple first aid.

OSHA regulations regarding recordable injuries

Employers in Maryland face potentially severe penalties if they run afoul of workplace safety regulations, and checking records for accuracy is often among the first steps taken by OSHA inspectors. Employers hoping to avoid fines or other sanctions must keep track of workplace injuries and illnesses if they are considered recordable under OSHA regulations, but employers are sometimes unclear about the line of demarcation.

Tips for preventing work-related skin disorders

In many types of jobs in Maryland and throughout the nation, occupational skin disorders can be problematic for both employers and their employees. In fact, according to a recent report from the Journal of the American Medical Association, employers can lose about 24 days and nearly $3,500 in workers' compensation claims from a single employee suffering from work-related dermatitis. However, there are ways to prevent occupational skin disorders from occurring at the workplace.

For-hire employee rights in Maryland

It is expected that many ride sharing companies will start treating their contracted workers like employees in the near future. A number of businesses that have started up recently depend on independent contractors. The best known examples are probably Lyft and Uber, which are riding sharing companies that allow individuals who work for them to determine their own hours.

Eyewash stations may be hazardous if not properly maintained

Maryland employees should be aware that, on Aug. 7, OSHA warned that using an emergency eyewash station that has not been properly maintained could lead to infection. These eyewash stations may be found in workplaces where corrosive chemicals are used, in research laboratories that deal with HIV and HBV and in medical facilities.

Dangerous nail salon chemicals under scrutiny

Maryland residents may have heard about the purported health risks associated with prolonged exposure to chemicals found in nail salons. New research has linked such chemicals to health issues such as asthma, respiratory disease, miscarriages and cancer. The threat is so concerning that New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued emergency regulations protecting nail salon workers in May after The New York Times published a series of articles highlighting the dangers of the chemicals.

Workers' compensation and telecommuters in Maryland

The work environment in Maryland as well as across the country has been changing, gradually allowing an increasing number of workers to work at least part time from their home. What people may not know, however, is that in some cases telecommuters may be eligible for workers' compensation benefits even if they are working at home when they suffer an injury.

How Can We Help You?

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.


Privacy Policy