Belsky Weinberg & Horowitz, LLC A Personal Injury & Workers’ Compensation Law Firm

Posts tagged "medical malpractice"

Dancing surgeon named in multiple medical malpractice suits

Professionalism in the work place can be much more than just a point of company pride -- it can be the difference between life and death. An out-of-state dermatologist was recently accused of behaving inappropriately in the operating room, causing severe injuries to her patients. She is currently facing at least five medical malpractice lawsuits, which Maryland victims of malpractice may also choose to utilize when seeking justice.

Fame doesn't make a doctor immune to medical malpractice

Maryland fans of reality television may be familiar with a show entitled, "My 600-lb Life" that profiles morbidly obese people as they go through their weight loss journeys. As part of the show, their care is overseen by Dr. Nowzaradan, referred to on the show as Dr. Now, who also performs weight-loss procedures on his patients as part of their care. Patients are painfully aware of the possible risks involved in the surgery, but many of them probably did not realize the danger could come from Dr. Now who is currently facing a medical malpractice claim from one of his patients.

Did medical malpractice cause Bill Paxton's death?

Maryland moviegoers may remember that Bill Paxton starred in big box office blockbusters such as "Twister," "Titanic" and "Aliens" throughout his career. He also graced the small screen in television shows such as "Big Love," which aired on HBO. He died on Feb. 25, 2017, just days after undergoing a surgical procedure on his heart at the age of 61. Now, his family has filed a lawsuit claiming that medical malpractice took his life.

Medical malpractice issues: Falling while in the hospital

One of the last places that you may think you are in any danger of suffering from an injury is in a Maryland hospital. You expect that the doctors, nursing and other staff will diligently work to protect your safety. Sadly, if that was always the case, there would be no need for medical malpractice laws.

Has your VA doctor been accused of medical malpractice?

Many veterans here in Maryland utilize U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers for their health care. For service and sacrifices as former members of the United States Armed Forces, they deserve the best care available. Sadly, a recent report indicates that the VA may knowingly hire doctors, including surgeons, who have been accused, and in some cases found guilty, of medical malpractice in the past.

Medical malpractice news: Doctor ordered to stop seeing patients

Many people around the country, including those here in Maryland, trust that when a doctor claims to be able to diagnose, treat or operate on a patient, he or she can actually back up that claim. Unfortunately, many medical malpractice cases here and elsewhere stem from a doctor or surgeon's lack of experience in a certain area. Nevertheless, some continue to practice medicine, which jeopardizes the safety and health of their patients.

Medical malpractice issues: Injuries to intestines and nerves

Do you envision instruments left inside a patient, removing the wrong organs and operating on the wrong patient when you think of surgical errors? If so, you are not alone. Many Maryland residents hear about these instances when it comes to news stories about medical malpractice. However, other injuries can wreak just as much havoc on a person's body and cause permanent injuries as well.

Is medical malpractice responsible for infant's death?

Many courts around the country and here in Maryland must answer this question far more often than anyone would prefer. No parent should have to leave a hospital without his or her child. Doing so would be difficult enough when doctors did everything they could to save the child, but when it is possible that medical malpractice led to the infant's death, it could be devastating.

Is perspiration a reliable indicator of surgical readiness?

When assessing the readiness of residents to perform surgery, the longstanding process has been for supervising surgeons to assess individual performance in the operating room. While this technique has proven effective for decades, the emergence of more regulatory bodies in surgical education has highlighted a need for a decidedly less subjective performance evaluator.

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